Batch Gardening

From my Seminole Voice newpaper column from a few years back:

When I started my modern gardening career using methods delineated in Mel Bartholomew’s book “Square Foot Gardening,” I eagerly built my 4-foot by 4-foot plot and planted as many varieties of vegetables as would fit into each of the 16 squares. I grew food with precision and devotion, eventually reaping a harvest of exactly as many radishes, carrots, beans and numerous other crops as would each fit into their respective 144-square-inch fields. The learning paradigm was priceless, the carrots tasted great, but the value of the food approached pennies per hour. Figurative starvation was on the horizon, so the next step was to line up multiples of the square plots into long growing beds and plant more of everything.

We have been brainwashed into believing eating fresh produce is best, no matter what the cost. Since shipping out-of-season beans or fruit all the way from California or Chile is cheaper than many homegrown preservation and pickling methods, why not eat fresh everything from everywhere forever? But if our garden production is of such limited quantities that fresh eating leaves none for the pickling crock when Florida’s multiple off-seasons roll around again, we are back to grocery land paying cash for someone else’s productivity.

Choose four to six basic crops your family wantonly consumes and write the plan to be the benefactor of these specific choices. Learn a few recipes and food storage techniques that will fill the coffers for the guaranteed seasonal dearth of homegrown freshness. Blanching and freezing, lacto-fermentation, canning or dehydrating are all viable ways to save those special foods you grew yourself.

Now is the time to plan for our long autumn growing season. Guesstimate the space to grow enough carrots, scallion onions, beans, and greens based on an average tallied from store bought receipts. Research the expected yield from available garden area, plan a little extra to share (the bugs always take their remittance), count the number of harvests expected from a season, do the math, obtain enough seeds, and hit the dirt. Instead of planting a little bit of everything, you can grow enough of those few things to really make a difference to a hungry belly.

In the kitchen during the cooler months, the ever-present cauldron of simmering soup wholeheartedly accepts more from the garden. Plan to add more of the basic crops to the kettle creating quantities to stock the freezer beyond tonight’s dinner. Heroism earned by procuring enough food to feed the family is now as simple as growing a batch of beans and radishes.

Advertisements