Time to order seeds

With Summer as the Florida gardener’s off-season, the time to prepare for the start of our Autumn season is now. Gather up the seed catalogs that were mailed months ago, compare products and prices, and pick your favorite crops.

 

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Here in Central Florida, I look to the end of the rainy season, sometime in late September, as the time to start planting to our garden growing beds. Since most of our crops are started as transplants from seedlings started in the greenhouse, 4-6 weeks of germination and initial growth must be accounted for. Simple math decrees that by mid-August, seeds should start hitting the dirt.

The only crops we directly seed to the garden soil are beans, carrots, and radishes. Carrots will not grow in the heat and wet soil of late Summer, so we usually wait until mid-October to start seeding them. Risking continued monsoon conditions of early September, try a planting smaller patches of beans and radishes to get the growing season started. Don’t procrastinate on the beans; the cold of Winter has been known to arrive as early as Thanksgiving, so for a 50-60 day crop that is cold sensitive, starting as early as possible is imperative.

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Knee High by 4th of July

I’ll come right out and say it: corn is a very unproductive crop for home gardeners in Florida. It produces poorly for the amount of space required, demands large amounts of fertilizer and water, and is susceptible to every pest imaginable. And don’t get me started on the ‘3 sisters’ method (which I have never seen successfully practiced).

Of course, fresh eating corn-on-the-cob is a completely different crops from the commodity grain grown on millions of acres and marketed through the largest distribution systems imaginable, but the price on store bought ears is still linked to the wholesale availability of its industrially produced twin. Organic corn is the only way to knowingly avoid direct contact with a more than likely GMO product and chemical pesticides.

As a kid, we grew it in our garden in Illinois, where the deep black topsoil guaranteed a bumper crop. And the only way anyone from the Land of Lincoln considered cooking it was fresh from the stalks directly into a kettle of boiling water then to the table in a matter of mere minutes. But that was before most of the aforementioned chaos tainted every purchase decision. So, as the saying goes “Knee high by 4th of July”, but not in my Florida garden.

Farm Stand Fun

Activities at our farm stand, Saturdays 9am-1pm and Tuesday 3pm-6pm, are fun for the whole family. Many of our crops are picked to order, so take a walk into the garden while we harvest them as fresh as they can get. Sample and smell what herbs are supposed to taste like before they’ve been dried, processed, and package. Stay in touch with our ‘Harvest Gardener’ membership for a one-time $20, to receive weekly email newsletter and crop list, invites to our special events, and half price on workshops and tours. Our most popular activity is a visit to the rabbit paddock, an outdoor colony where our rabbits are free to live like rabbits should. Visits to the bunnies are $10/family, or $5/members. Hope to see you in the garden.

Saturday Morning Farm Stand

Open 8-Noon Saturday mornings

Please visit our Sundew Gardens farm stand open Saturday mornings, 8-Noon, for the freshest produce you can possibly find. We’re only providing what we grow; the selection and quantities can vary weekly, so visit early and visit often. This week we’re providing cherry and Roma tomatoes, sweet banana peppers, Asian eggplant, scallion onions, yellow wax beans, purple daikon radishes, fennel, several varieties of herbs, cucumbers, and eggs. Please bear with us as we enter our Summer growing season, which is always a challenge, but your support will encourage even greater efforts.