Salad Herbs

The full spectrum of salad herbs are what make lettuce a real meal. Garden fresh heads of leafy green, red, and Romaine are at their prime at this time of year (February in Florida). img_0877Take advantage by adding even more goodness while keeping the simplicity of the harvest at hand.

img_0888Arugula, Italian dandelions, French sorrel, dill, watercress, parsley, and nasturtium leaves and flowers are all easy to grow and harvest. Quantity has a quality all its own, so if store bought bunches are too much, consider growing a container garden for the selection if not the bulk. (And no, I’m not talking about clamshells of week old micro-greens from a farm on the other side of the continent. )

img_0900Etymology 101: Salad/salivation. Bitter herbs induce salivation. Add a few Italian dandelion leaves to your salad to aid in digestion by providing even more saliva than a mouth watering salad would normally.

img_0541Let the fun begin by topping off your salad with the addition of nasturtium flowers. Although quite peppery (hence their nickname of ‘Nasties’) on their own, as a part of the whole, a fine addition. Another peppery addition would be watercress, but nowhere near as pretty.

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Knee High by 4th of July

I’ll come right out and say it: corn is a very unproductive crop for home gardeners in Florida. It produces poorly for the amount of space required, demands large amounts of fertilizer and water, and is susceptible to every pest imaginable. And don’t get me started on the ‘3 sisters’ method (which I have never seen successfully practiced).

Of course, fresh eating corn-on-the-cob is a completely different crops from the commodity grain grown on millions of acres and marketed through the largest distribution systems imaginable, but the price on store bought ears is still linked to the wholesale availability of its industrially produced twin. Organic corn is the only way to knowingly avoid direct contact with a more than likely GMO product and chemical pesticides.

As a kid, we grew it in our garden in Illinois, where the deep black topsoil guaranteed a bumper crop. And the only way anyone from the Land of Lincoln considered cooking it was fresh from the stalks directly into a kettle of boiling water then to the table in a matter of mere minutes. But that was before most of the aforementioned chaos tainted every purchase decision. So, as the saying goes “Knee high by 4th of July”, but not in my Florida garden.

Farm Stand Fun

Activities at our farm stand, Saturdays 9am-1pm and Tuesday 3pm-6pm, are fun for the whole family. Many of our crops are picked to order, so take a walk into the garden while we harvest them as fresh as they can get. Sample and smell what herbs are supposed to taste like before they’ve been dried, processed, and package. Stay in touch with our ‘Harvest Gardener’ membership for a one-time $20, to receive weekly email newsletter and crop list, invites to our special events, and half price on workshops and tours. Our most popular activity is a visit to the rabbit paddock, an outdoor colony where our rabbits are free to live like rabbits should. Visits to the bunnies are $10/family, or $5/members. Hope to see you in the garden.